Print this trip dossier

Journey Latin America asks you to accept cookies for performance and social media purposes. We use cookies on our website to personalise content, evaluate website traffic and enhance performance. You can delete or restrict cookies via your web browser. To get more information about these cookies and the processing of your personal data see our Cookie Policy. Do you accept these cookies and the processing of personal data involved? Find out more


Andean Flamingo: Andes laid bare

UK clients depart arriving Lima, Peru, the same day.
 

Day 1

Overnight in the capital.
 
Cathedral, Lima, Peru
Those passengers arriving on an international flight will be met at the airport by the Journey Latin America tour leader or a local representative. The drive to the hotel encapsulates the invigorating chaos of a modern Latin American capital city. Lima, the City of Kings, was once the capital of Spanish America, and the remnants of its glorious past can still be seen in the faded grandeur of the colonial churches and splendid, traditional wooden balconies in the city centre.

The explosive growth of the last 50 years, so typical of capital cities in the developing world, has transformed Lima into a bustling low-rise city of more than 6 million people. Away from the busy centre, there are some superb traditional restaurants as well as archaeological museums filled to the rafters with pre-Columbian treasures. In crowded streets, throngs of traffic race out towards Miraflores on the coast, a modern middle-class suburb where your hotel is located.

[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
Cathedral, Lima, Peru

Day 2

Fly to Cusco, afternoon at leisure.
 
Fly to Cusco (1 hour). The name Cusco derives from the Quechua word for navel, indicating its location at the centre of the Inca Empire; one that reached its peak as Columbus prepared to sail across the Atlantic. Its many impressive original Inca walls display extraordinary craftsmanship, and the squares are dotted with ornate colonial churches. It's a vibrant, lively city, where shoeshine boys and postcard sellers jostle for your attention on cobbled streets lined with handicraft shops and cafés. In the evening, the town squares fill with people flocking to the many restaurants (both upmarket and sophisticated cuisine and local delicacies are on offer), bars and clubs.

Day 3

Excursion to the Sacred Valley of the Incas; overnight.
 
Sacred
Today, head out from Cusco over the high plains and descend to explore the fertile Sacred Valley of the Incas. Once the bread-basket of the Inca Empire, it was heavily populated in imperial times and scores of archaeological sites remain, where well-preserved ruins bear witness to the highly developed society that the Incas created. The drive passes through or close to several of the villages and temple fortresses that pepper the valley.

The Pisac complex, set high above and visible from the eponymous colonial village you will visit, is built on terraces carved into the steep hillsides. The engineering and preservation are unrivalled. From the flat valley floor this intricate hillside rises up like a green staircase to the heavens.

Continue along this picturesque, patchwork valley to the temple of Ollantaytambo. The snow-frosted Andean cordillera forms a stunning backdrop. Ollantaytambo, sitting strategically at the gateway to the Amazon basin, was never captured by the Spanish conquistadors, but the inhabitants decided that the settlement was too vulnerable and would eventually fail, and so they abandoned it. The fortress, the colonial grid plan and the Inca foundations are still intact and there are wonderful views down over the sloping hillsides and into the fertile valley. You spend the night in the tranquil valley.

[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
Sacred

Day 4

By train to Machu Picchu, guided tour of the ruins.
 
Set off by rail to Machu Picchu (2½ hours). As the Urubamba river enters its narrow gorge between thickly-forested granite hills, there is room only for a single track, which hugs the right bank and passes through hamlets that are no more than a collection of shacks beside the railway. Arrive in the small, sub-tropical spa village of Machu Picchu, where you leave your bags at the hotel and board a bus for a precipitous journey up a sinuous road to the Inca site of Machu Picchu and take a guided tour.

The American explorer Hiram Bingham discovered the site in 1911, by which time it was completely buried beneath tropical cloud forest. It soon became clear to excavators that the conquistadors had never found the city, and for many years it was mistaken for the legendary last refuge of the Incas, Vilcabamba.

Fancy hiking some of the Inca Trail without interrupting your tour? We can organise for you to walk the mini Inca Trail on this day, but still, have a guided tour of the ruins and stay with the group in the evening. Please ask us for more details.

Day 5

Optional re-entry to the site; return to Cusco by train.
 
Optional revisit to the ruins. It is the location, perhaps, that most captures the imagination, set on a ridge spur amid forested peaks and above a roaring river canyon. Over the 2 days there is time to explore some of the many trails within the site; follow the steep path up Huayna Picchu the conical peak which juts out behind the ruins (please enquire with the office, as spaces are limited and it's necessary to pre-book) for wonderful views over the site, or hike to the vertiginous Inca Bridge, carved into a cliff edge. Your tour leader will be on hand to talk through the various walks.

You may prefer to relax and wander the narrow vehicle-free streets of Machu Picchu village, lined with bars and cafés. You return to Cusco on the afternoon train, arriving in the early evening.

Day 6

Guided tour of Cusco and Sacsayhuamán.
 
Lam
A guided tour of Cusco, which includes a visit to several nearby Inca ruins. You visit Q’oricancha, once the principal Inca Sun Temple, with extraordinarily intricate stonework, and then explore the colossal zigzag walls of Sacsayhuamán, brooding on a hillside above Cusco. In 1536 a desperate and defining 3 day battle was fought between the Spaniards and the Incas around this fortress/temple; the first conquistadors to see it were overawed, and centuries later it is still an extraordinary and imposing sight.
[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
Lam

Day 7

Scenic road journey to Lake Titicaca.
 
The memorable drive from Cusco to Puno (7 hours - with comfort breaks at places of interest and photo opportunities) follows the narrow Huatanay Valley south through an intensively farmed arable landscape. Ancient villages, small farmsteads and market towns line the river banks as the road climbs steadily to the high pass at La Raya (4,300 metres), after which point the scenery changes dramatically as you cross the altiplano, a vast, windswept plain, punctuated by occasional market towns, where bowler-hatted women tend herds of llamas and alpacas.

Puno is situated on the shores of Lake Titicaca and the town has a huge market and one of the largest universities in Peru. Exquisite Lake Titicaca sits high in the Andes (at 3,805 metres, the highest navigable lake in the world) on the Peruvian-Bolivian border, and is the focal point for subsistence farmers in the region who fish its dazzling sapphire waters and plant crops along the fertile shores.

Day 8

By road to Copacabana. Boat excursion on Lake Titicaca
 
Isla del Sol
Set off along the lakeshore towards the Bolivian border. The still waters almost lap the road, and wader birds may be seen negotiating the reeds. Copacabana is a pretty little town impressively located between two grand hills on the shores of Lake Titicaca. Its beach gave the name to the better known one in Rio. Excursion by boat to the nearby Sun Island (Isla del Sol). Sun Island was an important pilgrimage destination even before the arrival of the Incas; originally called Titicaca, it gave the lake its name. Terraced slopes provide sustenance for its small farming communities. From one of the walking trails here you can squint across the sparkling lake to the ice-jacketed peaks of the Cordillera Real beyond. Return to Copacabana for the night.

[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
Isla del Sol

Day 9

Continue to La Paz.
 
Travel by road across the bleak altiplano with views over the snow-tipped, spidery peaks of the Cordillera Real before it makes a spectacular descent into La Paz. At over 3,500m this is the highest capital city in the world. You arrive through the highland suburb of El Alto, which has grown so rapidly with an influx of rural migrants in search of work, that it is now a huge city in its own right. Soon after, you find yourself on the rim of a vast canyon and the city of La Paz spreads out before you, a glittering mosaic of tin, slate and tile roofs, interspersed with a line of skyscrapers that march down the valley. And beyond, keeping an eye on it all, is the colossal bulk of Mount Illimani.

Day 10

Walking tour of the city.
 
La Paz, Bolivia
This busy city has a 60% indigenous population; women dress in voluminous multicoloured skirts and bowler hats and have centre partings, as decreed by the Spanish monarch 3 centuries ago. Your 2 full days in the city give you plenty of opportunity to explore the colonial centre around Plaza Murillo, to stroll through the steep narrow streets, and around the many open and covered markets; it's the street life here, the sounds and smells, that make it so fascinating. You are orientated in the compact city centre by a walking tour.

[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
La Paz, Bolivia

Day 11

At leisure; optional excursions.
 
At leisure further to explore.  There is an optional excursion to the ruins of Tiwanaku, about which little is known. Travel 2 hours from of La Paz across the bleak, tawny earth of the altiplano, past glimmering lakes and herds of haughty alpacas. These pre-Columbian ruins are considered among the most important on the continent, and the massive gateways and imposing walls are redolent of bygone glory. It is believed that the inhabitants here were more advanced than the Incas in pottery, mathematics, art and astronomy. Explore a new museum on the site which houses more than 100 artefacts and provides a fascinating insight into the history of the ruins.

Alternatively you may choose to venture out of town to Chacaltaya, once the world's highest ski resort, located at 5,000m in the Cordillera Real. It takes around 90 minutes to climb the 7km of winding, rural roads. There's no longer any snow here, but from a wooden chalet house, set on a steep cliff there are views over 3 countries, the cordillera and Lake Titicaca twinkling in the distance.

Days 12-14

Fly to Uyuni and begin your exploration of the Uyuni salt flats.
 
Uyuni
Early start to fly south from La Paz to Uyuni (45 minutes), a small and unremarkable settlement which cowers on a wind ravaged and remote plateau; gateway to a starkly intense area of outstanding natural beauty. After a visit to the 'train cemetery' on the outskirts of town it is straight onto the salt flats for the next 3 days of your journey. The salar is a dizzying sight. The surface is utterly featureless, smooth, and composed of nothing but pure, dazzling white salt. After rain a thin layer of water covers the surface, turning the salt flats into a huge mirror reflecting an inverted sky. In the centre lies the Isla del Pescado, a small island covered in giant cacti, where you stop to stretch your legs and soak up the view.

The next 2 days are spent travelling by 4WD on this extraordinary, other-worldly journey. Once across the Salar, the drive continues on unpaved tracks across a lofty and bitterly cold plateau. The pale ochre beauty of the ashen hills and moonlike rock formations is suddenly broken by the opalescent colours of remote lagunas Verde and Colorado. As you swoop down into the Atacama Desert you see a distant patch of green, the oasis of San Pedro.

[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
Uyuni

Day 15

Explore San Pedro de Atacama.
 
Atacama desert
San Pedro is a timeless adobe town with a laid back atmosphere and an erratic electricity supply. Its dusty streets are lined with bars, cafés and tour operators offering various kinds of excursions into the surrounding desert.

Should you choose to take the morning optional excursion to El Tatio Geysers, be prepared for a very early start. But it's well worth it. You arrive on the pitted, craggy geyser field just before dawn, and as the sun rises and warms the earth, hot steam projects dramatically out of the crater into the freezing morning air, creating a wall of mist through which you can make out dark silhouettes and the penetrating sunlight. Note that a rapid ascent to an altitude of 4,500m makes this excursion unsuitable for some. Alternatively you may want to walk to Pukará de Quitor (3 km). This old Inca fortress has superb views of the mountains and volcanoes bordering Bolivia and Argentina. On the included excursion to the Moon Valley you arrive late afternoon to explore shady gorges and dramatic canyons formed over centuries by the erosion of salt mountains. Just before dusk, climb to the ridge of a vast golden sand dune to see the landscape lit up in different shades of pink, crimson and mandarin cast by the setting sun.

[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
Atacama desert

Day 16

Fly to Santiago: time permitting, optional excursion to a vineyard.
 
Santiago, Chile
A bus takes you to nearby Calama (90 minutes) for the 2 hour flight to Santiago. Set in a broad valley between the high Andes and a smaller coastal range, Chile's capital has a distinctly Mediterranean feel.

For a panoramic view over the city, visit Cerro Santa Lucía, a central romantic park; for even more dramatic vistas, a cable car leads to the summit of San Cristóbal, where you can join Chilean families wandering along the leafy paths. Afterwards, have a beer at one of the pavement cafés in Bellavista. This is an Italian quarter of narrow streets peppered with bars and shops selling local lapis lazuli (only Chile and Afghanistan produce the stones in commercial quantities).

The museum and house of Chilean poet laureate Pablo Neruda is close by, and its unusual interior with an eclectic collection of paintings and bric-a-brac is well worth a visit. Time permitting, you may wish to visit one of the vineyards close to Santiago, to sample some famous Chilean wine.

[en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowMore] [en-US:Components/FT042-ItineraryDetailed/ShowLess]
Santiago, Chile

Day 17

Depart on international flight or extension.
 

UK clients arrive home the following day.
 

Speak to an expert Travel Consultant or send us your enquiry today.

Start planning your trip

Our travel experts all have first-hand experience, which they are excited to share with you.

97% of our clients rated their experience with us as Excellent or Good.

Speak to an expert Travel Consultant or send us your enquiry today. Andean Flamingo: Andes laid bare

  • Nazca Lines + Paracas 3 days from £700pp

    Travel to the Paracas Peninsula and explore the bird-smothered Ballestas Islands by boat. Fly over the Nazca Lines for a bird’s eye view of the giant symbols and lines carved into skeletal desert rock by the pre-Columbian Nazca people.

    Day 1: From Lima, travel by public coach south to Paracas (3.5hrs) on the Panamerican Highway, which follows the contours of the coastal cliffs, carving a lonely path through bleak desert scenery. The severity of the sparsely populated landscape is relieved by tiny oases producing dates or maize and rickety fishing villages. Your modern hacienda-style hotel, La Hacienda Bahia Paracas, overlooks Paracas Bay.

    Day 2: Embark on a private motor-launch tour of the Ballestas Islands, which comprise one of the most important wildlife areas of Peru. The arches and caves - the result of wind and tide erosion - provide shelter for thousands of seabirds: albatrosses, cormorants, boobies, pelicans and the odd Humboldt penguin. The coves and surrounding waters are also visited by sea-lions, the mournful cries of which mingle with the screeches of the birds in a cacophonous symphony of sound.

    Later, board a light aircraft for a 90min flight to and over the Nazca Lines. This series of giant geometrical figures, animals and insects was etched into the desert floor by the Nazca people over a period of several hundred years. The interpretation of the lines puzzles scientists – do they comprise an astronomical map, calendar or astrological symbols? The rocky, wind-contorted desert scenery seen from the air is as startling as the lines themselves.

    Day 3: Return to the city of Lima to continue your holiday or to the airport for your international flight.

    UK clients arrive home the following day

    Breakfast daily.

  • Easter Island in depth 6 days from £2,274pp

    Polynesian Easter Island (Rapa Nui) lies 3,790km off the Chilean coast in the remote sub-tropical South Pacific. Windswept and grassy on one side, lushly vegetated on the other, and with a benign climate, it is famous for the clusters of huge enigmatic stone heads standing starkly against an azure skyline. Experience the unique atmosphere and friendly welcome.

    These few days on the island, with private excursions guided by enthusiastic experts in the field, will give you an insight-filled experience to satisfy your curiosity about the unique Rapa Nui culture. Triangular in shape, Easter Island measures no more than 8 miles at its widest point - with a huge, extinct volcanic crater at each of its extremes.

    Day 1: Fly from Santiago to Easter Island and continue to the secluded Hotel Altiplánico.  At 3km from the main town, Hanga Roa, it’s just a stone's throw from the ocean. Guest rooms resembling traditional boat houses are scattered over its tropical gardens. Facilities include a terrace and small pool.

    Day 2:  Full-day tour to introduce Easter Island's most iconic moai statues and intriguing archaeological heritage, encompassing the highlights of the island's north and east coast. There’s time to inspect the statues, explore a volcano and its extinct crater, and swim off a white-sand beach.

    Day 3: Explore geological and historic highlights in the south of the island. View 6 toppled statues, with admirable close-fitting Rapa Nui stonework. Continue to the quarry of the topknots, or 'hats', which adorned many of the moai, and on to view a 1km long collapsed lava tube used by early Easter Islanders as a dwelling. Next stop is the inland ahu (ceremonial platform) of Akivi, one of Easter Island's iconic and most photographed sites.

    Later visit Rano Kau, an extinct volcanic crater 1.6km across and 200m deep.  It is Easter Island's most spectacular natural attraction. Continue to Orongo, dramatically perched between the cliffs and the crater's edge, the site of the historic Birdman competition.

    Day 4: At leisure. You might take an optional 11km cliff-top walk which showcases the gloriously rugged coastline and volcanic landscape, with sweeping vistas across the Pacific Ocean. The hike ends at Anakena, a white coral beach.

    Day 5: Witness the citrus-hued sunrise at Ahu Tongariki. This vivid display of an artist's palette of colour can be especially memorable between October and April when the sun rises directly behind the 15-moai platform.Transfer to the airport and fly back to Santiago.

    Breakfast daily.

    You will need a positioning night in Santiago at either the beginning or end of your visit to Easter Island, depending on your itinerary. A stay at an airport hotel has been included in the cost.

  • Easter Island overview 5 days from £1,389pp

    Polynesian Easter Island (Rapa Nui) lies 3,790km off the Chilean coast in the remote sub-tropical South Pacific. Windswept and grassy on one side, lushly vegetated on the other, and with a benign climate, it is famous for the clusters of huge enigmatic stone heads standing starkly against an azure skyline. Experience the unique atmosphere and friendly welcome.

    These few days on the island, with group excursions led by local guides, will give you an overview of the wilderness landscapes and the unique Rapa Nui culture. Triangular in shape, Easter Island is about the size of greater London - each point of the triangle marked by a huge extinct volcanic crater.

    Day 1: Fly from Santiago to Easter Island and continue to your hotel, the O'Tai, a guesthouse in the centre of Hanga Roa, the main town on the island. It is a pleasant place set in large well-kept gardens, with a view of the sea in the distance.

    Day 2: Visit Vaihu, where many of the massive carved maoi heads lie before heading off to Akahanga, where a dozen standing moais - backs turned to the ocean - stand on a massive plinth. Move on to the Rano Raraku volcanic crater and Poike quarry where hundreds of Cyclopean heads litter the hillside, some finished others half-carved. It's an easy uphill walk to get to the crater of the volcano. Continue to the pink-sand beach of Anakena, where you can swim and enjoy your packed lunch, returning to your hotel late afternoon.

    Day 3: A bus takes you to the rim of the Rano Kao crater, where you go on foot to the ceremonial village of Orongo. It is here than the annual ceremony of the Bird Man or Tangata Manu would take place here among its stone-built houses and food stores. The object of the ceremony - or quest - was to find and bring back the first egg laid by the seabird manutara, a type of tern. Continue to the caverns of Ana Kai Tangata, where the islanders took refuge during times of war and where there are some pre-historic paintings.

    Day 4: Transfer to the airport and fly back to Santiago.

    Breakfast daily, picnic lunch day 2.

    You will need a positioning night in Santiago at either the beginning or end of your visit to Easter Island, depending on your itinerary. A stay at an airport hotel has been included in the cost.

 

Do you have a question?

Ask about this trip

Or speak to an expert on 03098589426

Close

Please select from the following:

Start Date
End Date
Price pp
Single
Supplement
Start Date

4 Aug 2019

End Date

20 Aug 2019

Price pp

£4,475

Single
Supplement

£969

Start Date

22 Sep 2019

End Date

8 Oct 2019

Price pp

£4,475

Single
Supplement

£969

Start Date

5 Apr 2020

End Date

21 Apr 2020

Price pp

£4,475

Single
Supplement

£969

Start Date

17 May 2020

End Date

2 Jun 2020

Price pp

£4,475

Single
Supplement

£969

Close

Sign up to our newsletter

Sign up to our twice monthly newsletter and be the first to know about our latest news, offer and competitions.

Sign up with...

Your email

Or...

Using a social account is fast and means you don't need to remember a password.

We never share your data either - see our terms & conditions

Facebook Connect

Remember, you can unsubscribe at any time.

To see how we take care of your data please review our Privacy Policy

Thanks for subscribing – we’ll be in touch!

You are not subscribed. Some error happened.

Share this Page

Social share page will open in new window

Send a friend

reCaptcha_try_again

Page Full Path: /sitecore/content/JLA/Home/destinations/peru/holidays/andean-flamingo-andes-laid-bare/itinerary

Page ID: {5514B82B-33ED-40D0-819A-93EA0FCB0FA0}

Page Name: itinerary

Page Display Name: Itinerary

Page Template Name: T014-Group-DetailedItinerary-JJ

Page Template ID: {5706736A-C943-48B6-A9E2-E71F445F67EB}

Parent ID: {A8DE2573-63AD-4208-9E41-EA0F2EC1D6BA}

Parent Name: andean-flamingo-andes-laid-bare

Parent Display Name: Andean Flamingo: Andes laid bare

Parent Template Name: T013-Group-Tour-JJ

Parent Template ID: {94BF26AA-F5AF-4715-95D3-405F5E74AE8F}